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All of our articles are fun reads and intended to be informative, whether historically speaking or from a contemporary perspective. If you don’t know anything about Oscar Peterson, mentor for some and true idol of many jazz fans, this is your chance to get in the know. And even if you’re a loyal Dave Brubeck fan, don’t be surprised if you learn something new about the artist. ENJOY!

Oscar Peterson Trio
Canadian born pianist Oscar Peterson is most readily identified by the music of the Oscar Peterson Trio, arguably the greatest jazz trio in history. Heavily influenced by the sound of the Nat King Cole trio, the Oscar Peterson Trio stuck to the same format of piano, bass and guitar. Because of the driving sound and high rhythmic energy of both these trios, few listeners even noticed there was no drummer pounding out the time. read more...

Dave Brubeck—a True Jazz Artist
To say that Dave Brubeck is a legendary jazz artist is an understatement. The man pioneered what became known as cool jazz and west coast jazz. Much more than a pianist, this jazz artist is also a composer and band leader, writing such jazz standards as “In Your Own Sweet Way” and “The Duke.” read more...

The Picture--A Great Day in Harlem—Honoring Jazz Artists Everywhere.
Without a doubt, it’s the most famous jazz artists picture of all time. There were fifty-seven great jazz musicians who gathered together on the steps of a Harlem brownstone early in the morning one day in August 1958 to commemorate the history of jazz. read more...

The Evolution of Jazz Bands
Think African-American music and you can’t help but think jazz bands!
Somewhere between 1895-1900, what we know today as jazz came to life in the crescent city—New Orleans. The jazz bands that began popping up were a combination of the blues, ragtime, and marching band music. What separated these new jazz bands from these earlier styles was the far-reaching use of improvisation, not just solo but often with multiple players. read more...

NYC—Mecca for Live Jazz, Yesterday and Today!
If you’re a enthusiast, aficionado, or whatever you want to call yourself, you know that there’s nothing like live jazz in New York City. From the 1900s to the present, the city is rich in history and venues. From swing to bebop, the city was and still is covered up with the live jazz sound that has earned it notoriety worldwide. read more...

What to Work On In Your Solo Piano Technique
The beauty of being a solo piano artist is that you don’t need anybody else, or so one might think. But then reality sets it: doing it all on your own can be downright difficult. read more...

The Great American Songbook and the Standards
Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr…these are just some of the vocalists whose repertoires were heavenly laden with the songs from the Great American Songbook—songs that transcend time and are so easily identified with our national music heritage. read more...

The Piano Jazz Trio
Most often, the term piano jazz trio refers to a group that consists of a pianist, a double bass player and a drummer. The pianist is normally the group’s leader and such trios are usually named after their pianist. read more...

More Than One Piano Trio Rocks
Traditionally speaking, a piano trio is an ensemble of piano, plus two other instruments. The plus two are usually violin and cello, or some closely related cousin of these conventional stringed pieces. The mention of a piano trio most always references classical chamber music, too, and more often than not denotes an ensemble of artists who regularly perform this repertoire together. read more...

How “Whisperings” Solo Piano Music Makes a Difference
You’re an indie solo piano music player and you want to promote your music but there are no radio stations close by that play your style. That puts you in a bit of a jam. So what’s the answer? How about starting your own radio station—online—and reach out to the world. read more...

Defining the Jazz Pianist
Today’s jazz pianist delivers a musical art form which dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. African American communities in the Southern United States combined the sounds of African and European traditions and produced a musical style that emphasizes the use of blue notes, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation, and the swing note.
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Jazz and Blues—Who Knew!
Jazz and blues are often referred to as cousins. Many believe jazz came out of the blues, or that jazz has its roots in the blues. Actually jazz and blues are like brothers, they grew up side by side. read more...

New Orleans Jazz and Pete Fountain
Go Hand-in-Hand!

Pete Fountain is one of those New Orleans jazz musicians who's been there, done that…and hasn’t missed a beat. This man knows himself, is very content with the skin he occupies, and has enjoyed much success over the years. read more...

Mention Swing Band, and You Better Mention Count Basie
It's been called swing music, swing jazz, and sometimes just "swing." This form of jazz music emerged in the early 1930s. By 1935, jazz music, which would eventually manifest itself in the swing band format, had established itself as a distinctive style in America. read more...


Jazz Styles—the Sub-genres!
When it comes to the subject of jazz styles, without blinking an eye, Louis Armstrong was once quick to reply when asked for a definition of jazz music, "Man , if you gotta ask, you’ll never know." read more...



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